International Cesarean Awareness Network » http://www.ican-online.org Education. Support. Advocacy. Mon, 29 Aug 2016 06:52:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.ican-online.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/cropped-ICAN-bkgd-light-32x32.png » http://www.ican-online.org 32 32 Announcing Melissa Stern, our new leader in Phoenix! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/announcing-melissa-stern-our-new-leader-in-phoenix/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/announcing-melissa-stern-our-new-leader-in-phoenix/#comments Sat, 27 Aug 2016 15:54:54 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5527 Continue reading →]]>

ICAN is excited to announce Melissa Stern as our newest chapter leader! She has completed training and will be leading ICAN of Phoenix!

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How did you find out about ICAN? What drew you to our organization?
 My midwife told me about it.

 

What part of being an ICAN Chapter Leader are you most excited about and why? 
I’m excited to have an opportunity to reach women and help them to have an empowered birth.

 

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What do you wish other people knew about ICAN? 
We’re there for the mamas that have had cesareans, are pregnant, thinking about getting pregnant, had a CBAC or had a VBAC.

 

What would you say are some of your strongest beliefs about cesarean/VBAC awareness?
Many people ARE good candidates for a VBAC, and many mothers have been misinformed as to the real reasons they didn’t have a vaginal birth the first time. I hope to empower women through knowledge a lot of encouragement to ask the right questions, and explore VBAC as an option for them with multiple providers.

 

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How would someone describe you?
Creative, multi-talented, relentless, loyal, extremely honest and your best advocate.

 

Please share a little about yourself.
 I’m married to my husband Jon, we’re celebrating our ten year wedding anniversary this year! We have a 65 pound, four year old golden-doodle puppy, two year old twin girls, and a 7 month old daughter. We’re both Arizona natives, and recently moved back to Phoenix after living in Portland for five years.

Prior to becoming a full time mom, I worked in educational technology helping districts and schools bring their students, teachers and communities into the 21st Century. I have a bachelors in International Business from Arizona State University, a post degree in Secondary Education, and a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology/Counseling from The University of Arizona.

In my free time, I love doing The Bar Method workout, trail running, cooking, painting, and learning new things.

My husband and I struggled with 8 years,of infertility. We had our twins via IVF, born healthy and full term by cesarean, then followed by a spontaneous pregnancy with my 3rd daughter, born HBAC in January if this year!

 

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QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR CHAPTER
Where is your chapter (region)? What areas does your chapter serve?
 Southwest, Phoenix, Arizona

 

If you could change one thing about the birth climate in your area, what would it be?
The midwives take a hard hit in this state making birth options extremely challenging outside of an medical office.

 

What is the best thing about the birth climate in your area?
 ICAN, the midwives and doulas are great!

 

Your first/next meeting time, date, location, and topic?  
Aug 24, 7pm, Difficulties during birth.
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When VBAC is Not Enough http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/when-vbac-is-not-enough/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/when-vbac-is-not-enough/#comments Sun, 21 Aug 2016 08:24:57 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5449 Continue reading →]]> ‘But at least you have a healthy baby!’

That seems to be the go-to statement to new mothers who have just had a cesarean. This is especially something we hear when all we want to do is share our feelings regarding what we may consider a ‘failed birth’. But what happens when you DO get that VBAC and not a second cesarean? What happens then?

‘But at least you got your VBAC!’

2nd heartbeatI’m hearing this more and more in various birth and support groups. But what if a VBAC isn’t enough? What if the VBAC was traumatic? What if the VBAC was more harmful than the original cesarean? Where does that leave the mother? We are told we should be happy and excited about the VBAC we worked and planned SO hard for! So where do we go for support when it isn’t what we envisioned? We don’t fit into the same groups as a CBAC mom, or a RCS mom or even every VBAC birth mom. It’s a different mental recovery. Yes, we did get the vaginal birth, but it’s not always the healing and empowering birth we desired.

I found myself in this space after my first VBAC. I was so excited, I was a success! I got the vaginal birth I wanted! Yet, I found myself struggling in the days after to process everything. For my first VBAC, I planned to go as far in labor as I could, but never ruled out meds or an epidural. In fact, I was pretty sure I was going to want an epidural at some point. I was checked at 9:15 am and was 5cm, so I was admitted. That’s when things went crazy. In an hour and a half my body was bearing down. I had gone from 5 to 9.5 in an hour and a half. At this point, it was too late for me to get any meds (except Nitrous, but that’s another post!). I HAD to go natural. The problem was, I hadn’t mentally prepared to go completely natural. I wasn’t prepared for the intensity of the sensations, pain, pressure, emotions. While yes, I was ecstatic to have just had a vaginal birth and to be holding and snuggling my new baby girl, I was having trouble processing the entire experience. You see, my cesarean was easy. My labor, surgery, recovery, everything was easy. Yes, it was unnecessary, but I was young and satisfied with the process. My VBAC was overwhelming. My emotions were all over the place. The friends I sought out wanted to celebrate my ‘success’, but I wanted to discuss how daunting it felt to me. It was hard to find that safe space and support when my feelings went against the grain.

So, how DO we support these mothers?

I was blessed and had an amazing group of friends who had a range of birth experiences themselves and allowed me to share and process in my own time. That is how we start, just like with a cesarean mother, by listening to their stories. Ask them how they felt about their birth. Let them share. Rather than trying to put your opinions of how you believe they should feel, listen. Was it safe? Were they supported? Was their birth plan followed? Or was it harmful? Were there unnecessary interventions? Was there a severe tear? Will it be a long recovery? Is the baby in the NICU? A cesarean mother IS thankful for their healthy baby. A VBAC mother IS thankful for the vaginal birth. None of those feelings takes away from them being unsatisfied with the birth process. These mothers need a safe place to hear it’s ok to not be happy with the birth. It’s ok to feel good about your cesarean. It’s ok to not be happy about your vaginal birth.

Birth is not one-size-fits-all. A cesarean can be healing just as easy as a VBAC can be traumatic. We need to get away from these go-to statements for both. These only discount the mother’s feelings about the birth and about the process, but focuses more on the outcome of the birth. It’s not up to us to decide if you had a healing or traumatic birth. We aren’t in your situation. We aren’t making the decisions you are making in the heat of the moment. Besides, traumatic can look different on each person, and a healing birth can look different for each person – regardless of cesarean birth or a vaginal birth. Someone can be more happy with a cesarean because they had a traumatic first vaginal birth. They can find that cesarean a healing and empowering birth while the thought of another vaginal birth is still traumatic.

​Let’s start listening to these mothers. Help them to find the beauty in their births, and get away from these go-to statements that aren’t supportive at all.

By Ann Marie Walsh from ICAN of Nashville, originally posted at NashvilleVBAC.com.

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ICAN Defends the Right of Prior Cesarean Mothers to Homebirth http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/ican-defends-the-right-of-prior-cesarean-mothers-to-homebirth/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/ican-defends-the-right-of-prior-cesarean-mothers-to-homebirth/#comments Wed, 17 Aug 2016 12:10:20 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5507 Continue reading →]]> no lesser rights

ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) has recently updated their opinion on the issue of homebirth. The latest statement from the professional organization of obstetricians includes some positives, such as an emphasis on patient autonomy…

“Although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists…believes that hospitals and accredited birth centers are the safest settings for birth, each woman has the right to make a medically informed decision about delivery.”

… an admonishment to keep a civil manner with patients in the event of a transfer…

“When antepartum, intrapartum, or postpartum transfer of a woman from home to hospital occurs, the receiving health care provider should maintain a nonjudgmental demeanor with regard to the woman and those individuals accompanying her to the hospital.”

… and an expanded assessment of qualified homebirth providers to embrace midwives “whose education and licensure meet International Confederation of Midwives’ Global Standards for Midwifery Education” which would include some CPMs (Certified Professional Midwives).  The opinion also makes clear that ACOG understands the importance of integrating homebirth services with the larger maternity system to improve safety and outcomes, an issue that the U.S. desperately needs to address.

However, the statement also takes a hard line against VBACs, breeches, and multiples as candidates for homebirth. This stance is highly problematic. While suggesting that providers “do all they can to facilitate transfer of care or co-management in support of a desired [VBAC],” they stop short of encouraging their members to offer VBAC services themselves or to become skilled at breech or multiple births. Not addressing this vacuum in the profession disregards an important issue in the homebirth debate. Until the lack of availability of VBAC-, breech-, and multiple-friendly providers is remedied, ACOG’s official opinion limits the majority of these women to a surgical delivery. The onus is on ACOG to create for her a viable alternative.

In fact, if ACOG is serious about a woman’s right to choose the birth setting for her child, it cannot deny the mothers of VBAC, breech, and multiples the option of homebirth. These women are not second class citizens who can be afforded lesser rights. They have the same capacity for informed consent and refusal as other women. Especially in light of the lack of providers for their situation, the right to birth at home for women facing a VBAC, breech, or multiple birth is inviolable.

Further reading:

ACOG’s 2016 Committee Opinion on Planned Home Birth

Henci Goer Compares and Contrasts the 2016 and the 2011 Committee Opinion

The National Association of Certified Professional Midwives’ Response

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ICAN 2016 – “Respectful Support in Childbirth” http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/ican-2016-respectful-support-in-childbirth/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/ican-2016-respectful-support-in-childbirth/#comments Thu, 11 Aug 2016 08:07:05 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5482 Continue reading →]]>

Hermine Haye's-Klein's quote from the ICAN 2016 conference.

One thing that was inadequately addressed in both my childbirth education and doula training was supporting women who have cesareans. The reason may be that the focus is so heavily placed on treating birth as a normal, natural process, that the reality that a third of all women give birth surgically somehow gets lost.

For this reason, I decided to attend the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) 2016 annual conference in Birmingham, AL. I packed up my kids and a friend to help out, drove the 11 hours south, checked into a campground and left my family each morning to attend the conference in the city.

The first speaker I heard was Hermine Hayes-Klein, a lawyer, lecturer and action researcher. Her lecture was entitled, “Claiming the Right to Respectful Support in Childbirth.” She was uncompromising in her support of a woman’s right to plan a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), asserting a woman’s human and legal right to make this choice:

  • Decisions in which women were forced to have RCS were erroneous.
  • When informed consent exists, the Dr. is not responsible if the woman refuses.
  • Finances, not liability, is the driving force (lots of research to support).
  • Having sacred rights respected is a human right:
    • Right to spiritual freedom
    • Right to cultural integrity
  • Legal right to birth at a location and with provider of choice falls under right to privacy. When midwives sanctioned, this right violated.

In the historical portion of her lecture, she described how the Witch Hammer, a 14th century guidebook used during the Inquisition, was used to annihilate midwives. She quoted the text as saying, “No one does more harm to the Catholic faith than midwives,” who were blamed for a baby shortage since they had knowledge of contraception. I cried while listening to how a group I so closely align myself with were systematically persecuted, but I’m glad to now have this knowledge.

Regarding birth plans, Ms. Hayes-Klein said, “Women like birth plans, but providers don’t.” She gave the following advice:

  • Use specific language: “My birth plan is that I will make all the decisions about my care on the basis of info, advice and support from my providers.”
  • Women like birth plans, providers do not.
  • Ask provider: “Is there any circumstance in which you would override my wishes or act without my consent?”

For women who believe that their rights have been violated during pregnancy and/or birth, she advised women to “Tell your provider what went wrong.” She said that providers need to hear about how their patients experience their care.

Reposted with permission from Faith Groesbeck’s Birth Quest Services blog.

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Elizabeth Quinn named ICAN’s August Volunteer of the Month! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/elizabeth-quinn-named-icans-august-volunteer-of-the-month/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/elizabeth-quinn-named-icans-august-volunteer-of-the-month/#comments Mon, 08 Aug 2016 09:16:22 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5493 Continue reading →]]> The International Cesarean Awareness Network is powered by the selfless efforts of our numerous volunteers. We cannot thank our dedicated volunteers enough for their cooperation and service in assisting ICAN with accomplishing its mission.

In an effort to acknowledge some of our amazing volunteers who work tirelessly behind the scenes to offer support, education, and advocacy for the mothers in their area, the International Cesarean Awareness Network is pleased to announce Elizabeth Quinn as the August 2016 Volunteer of the Month.

Elizabeth Quinn, this month’s honoree, is a dedicated volunteer out of ICAN of Jackson, MS. Elizabeth is a champion for VBAC advocacy. She has shared her stories on the Birth Hour podcasts, on several Facebook groups and with anyone who’ll listen. Her stories bring awareness, and empowerment, and she is proud to educate women on their rights and choices in childbirth. She has helped with meetings and at tables at community events. Many women have benefitted from her openness and knowledge. She just had her second VBA2C!

Get to know our Volunteer of the Month:

Tell us about being a volunteer with ICAN!

Elizabeth Quinn, August 2016 Volunteer of the Month

Elizabeth Quinn, August 2016 Volunteer of the Month

I have been a member of ICAN for about 4 years. A friend added me to the Facebook group then told me she did. I want every woman to feel the joy you get when you know your options, feel supported, and make the best decision for your birth. I let others control my first two births and felt very powerless- I wish every mama could feel as respected and supported as I did during my 2 vba2c births.

What was your proudest moment as an ICAN volunteer? What about your hardest?

When I watched a mama realize she had more options than those presented to her and she made the very hard choice to change doctors and attempt a vbac. My hardest moment was watching a mama be misled and misinformed by her doctor and never given a chance to labor. She left with a section scar and the belief that she couldn’t push out a baby. The hardest part was keeping my mouth shut and just supporting her through it and hoping she will come to me for support should she choose differently next time.
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We appreciate you so much, Elizabeth! Thank you for all that you do to support birthing women!

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Announcing Emmy Kissinger, our newest leader in Iowa! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/announcing-emerald-kissinger-our-newest-leader-in-iowa/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/announcing-emerald-kissinger-our-newest-leader-in-iowa/#comments Fri, 05 Aug 2016 06:30:52 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5477 Continue reading →]]>
ICAN is excited to announce Emmy Kissinger as our newest chapter leader! She has completed training and will be leading ICAN of Northeast Iowa!
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Tell us about the birth climate in your area.

I went into labor 11 days past my guess date. My labor was long so eventually my midwife suggested breaking my water. Thus the cascade of interventions began, ending with an emergency cesarean. I was not awake. My husband breastfed our child before I did. My healing journey has been one filled with wonderful women, love, and support. I am grateful.

I went into labor 11 days past my guess date. My labor was long so eventually my midwife suggested breaking my water. Thus the cascade of interventions began, ending with an emergency cesarean. I was not awake. My healing journey has been one filled with wonderful women, love, and support.

Northeast Iowa is in ICAN’s Midlakes region. The best thing about our area is having multiple midwives who truly embody holistic well-woman care. In my fantasy, every woman has the realistic option to have a home birth if she wants to.
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How did you find out about ICAN?
I learned about ICAN on Facebook and through my Bradley Method Class prior to my cesarean. We did not have a local chapter so I found other ways of accessing support after my birth. Later an opportunity to become a leader opened up and I jumped! I love advocacy work, education, and nurturing women. Therefore, ICAN was a natural fit.
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What excites you about ICAN?
I am most excited about having the opportunity to gather in a safe space with women in our community. I wish that other people knew about ICAN prior to their first birth. I wish that first time moms had an understanding of their risk of having a cesarean and how a cesarean can impact your daily life after the birth of your baby.
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Welcome to ICAN, Emmy!

Welcome to ICAN, Emmy!

What are some of your strongest beliefs about cesarean/VBAC awareness?

First, I believe that the number of cesareans can be reduced and should be. Second, I think it would be amazing to build awareness around respecting a woman’s right to have feelings about her birth so that she does not face stigma when telling her friends, co-workers, or when seeking support from an outside organization or agency.
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Please share a little about yourself!
I’m a spirited feminist with a love for educating others. I have one son (Fox), one husband (Zach), one dog, and two cats. I am a school psychologist by training and enjoy my work with students and teachers. Since college I have spent my free time learning about birth, breastfeeding, and feminist issues. After having my own baby I began to learn more about attachment parenting, research based parenting philosophies, and gentle parenting. I also enjoy running my Etsy shop, blogging, painting, gardening, and embracing my spirituality.
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Next meeting?
September 6th, 2016. We are hoping to have a guest speaker.
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Welcome, Emmy! We can’t wait to see how you impact your community!
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Introducing our newest chapter leader, Tasha Portley of Texas! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/5470/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/08/5470/#comments Wed, 03 Aug 2016 07:57:46 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5470 Continue reading →]]>
ICAN is excited to announce Tasha Portley as our newest chapter leader! She has completed training and will be leading ICAN of Tyler!
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Tell us about the birth climate in your area.

ICAN of Tyler is in Texas, our outside focus regions will be Palestine, Jacksonville, Longview, and Athens. We do have a Doula Network, but I wish we had more midwifery access here.

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How did you find out about ICAN?

Welcome to ICAN, Tasha!

Welcome to ICAN, Tasha!

I learned of ICAN after having a cesarean myself on the internet. I am excited to help women and their families navigate the birth community in preparation of their birth. I strongly believe that if we can prevent the primary cesarean, we can help empower women to birth healthy babies while sustaining her health as well.

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Tell us about yourself!
I am focused, determined, and driven. I am a 34 year old Registered Nurse (12 years). I have enjoyed the last few years working in the case management field. I am currently working in a Diabetes Center. I work with patients daily to help them self manage their diabetes. I am the mother of two precious boys. In my spare time I am enjoying quiet evenings with my family. I am excited about giving back to my community in which I live!
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Next meeting?
Join us August 10th 2016, 6-8 PM at Foundry coffee house!
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Welcome, Tasha! We can’t wait to see how you impact your community!
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Introducing Veronica Colon Perez, our newest leader in Puerto Rico! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/introducing-our-newest-leader-veronica-colon-perez-of-puerto-rico/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/introducing-our-newest-leader-veronica-colon-perez-of-puerto-rico/#comments Sat, 30 Jul 2016 08:15:08 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5466 Continue reading →]]>
ICAN is excited to announce Veronica Colon Perez as our newest chapter leader! She has completed training and will be leading ICAN Puerto Rico Area Metro!
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Tell us about the birth climate in your area.

We serve families in the metro area of Puerto Rico. The best thing about the birth climate in my area is that there is a couple of obstetricians and midwives that assist VBACs. In Puerto Rico it is not legal nor illegal to have a homebirth with twins and or breech babies; it’s just not regulated. I would love it if the health insurance companies would cover prenatal care and births assisted by midwives.

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Welcome in ICAN, Veronica!

Welcome in ICAN, Veronica!

How did you find out about ICAN?

I found out about it on Facebook. The cesarean rates in my area drew me to the organization. I am excited about being part of an organization that is compromised to improve maternal-child health by educating women, because I am driven to educate women so they can have humanized birth experiences and prevent unnecessary cesareans. I wish people knew ICAN can educate women to help them have better outcomes in their birth experiences and help women recover from a cesarean.
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What are some of your strongest beliefs about cesarean/VBAC awareness?
I think cesarean/VBAC awareness can help lower cesarean rates.
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How would someone describe you?
Someone would describe me as a passionate and charismatic person when it comes to empowering and educating women about humanized birth and breastfeeding.
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Please share a little about yourself!
I’m a psychology graduate and mother of two. My passion is to learn the more I can about breastfeeding to educate and help women to breastfeed successfully their babies. I also love taking pictures of memorable moments and editing them.
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Welcome, Veronica! We can’t wait to see how you impact your community!
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Review: Cut, Stapled, and Mended by Roanna Rosewood http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/review-cut-stapled-and-mended-by-roanna-rosewood/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/review-cut-stapled-and-mended-by-roanna-rosewood/#comments Sun, 24 Jul 2016 08:06:48 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5446 Continue reading →]]> Birth stories hold a special place in my heart, as they do for many other women. They tell a story that women can relate to; a story that can make us cry; a story that can make us laugh; or a story that can make us realize things about ourselves that we never knew before. All of the above is what happened to me when I read “Cut, Stapled, and Mended”, by Roanna Rosewood. The pages of this book are filled with Roanna’s story of her three births.

Cut, Stapled, and Mended by Roanna Rosewood

Cut, Stapled, and Mended
by Roanna Rosewood

I first heard about this book during my second pregnancy (a planned VBAC). I can honestly say that this book is what “lit the fire” to my yearning for a more fulfilling birth. In the first pages of “Cut, Stapled, and Mended”, Roanna instantly sets the tone for a very relatable story. Narrated by Roanna herself, she tells her story from childless, to mother of three, and all of the in between.

This book not only tells the story of three births, it touches on the taboo topic of cesareans in America. “It’s no wonder that babies, who used to arrive at all hours of the night, and on weekends and holidays also, are now most often born on weekdays” (p.51). Rosewood goes on to talk about her experience with two cesareans, both home birth cesareans, and the misinformation modern medicine can give women during one of the most vulnerable times of their life.

During her third pregnancy, Roanna discovered things about herself that she never knew before. In addition to doing everything she could, physically, to experience the birth she had always dreamed of for her and her baby, she did a lot of self- healing. She faced darker feelings and emotions, to overcome them and be at peace with herself and her inner feminine being.

That last part is what resonated with me so much. Going into my second pregnancy, as with many other women, I had a lot of unresolved feelings about my first birth; feelings that I did not realize existed until I read this book. I think too often, women are made to hide their feminine feelings and inner self worth, especially when it comes to modern obstetrics. This book put words to my feelings.

After reading this book, I felt hopeful for my future births. I felt that if someone else could feel the way I did, and go on to have a magical birth, then I could to. I believe this would be the same for most women. I think this book is a must read for any woman, not only those seeking a VBAC, but any woman who has felt held down by the way our society thinks a woman should behave.

Review by Talia Haynes of ICAN of Tucson

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Introducing Casey Shell, our newest chapter leader! http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/introducing-casey-shell-our-newest-chapter-leader/ http://www.ican-online.org/blog/2016/07/introducing-casey-shell-our-newest-chapter-leader/#comments Fri, 22 Jul 2016 10:41:04 +0000 http://www.ican-online.org/?p=5460 Continue reading →]]>
ICAN is excited to announce Casey Shell as our newest chapter leader! She has completed training and will be co-leading ICAN of Huntsville!
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Tell us about the birth climate in your area.
We serve families North Alabama. Change is slowly starting to happen here. I wish that women would be given the opportunity to VBAC without fear.
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Welcome to ICAN, Casey!

Welcome to ICAN, Casey!

How did you find out about ICAN?

My doula first mentioned ICAN in the immediate days following my cesarean. I avoided meetings for a while, but was so overwhelmed with my birth experience that I finally decided to go. The first meeting I attended was open forum. It was wonderful to be able to share with other women who didn’t have the “healthy baby, healthy mommy” perspective. I was able to grieve the loss of the birth I desired. I wish more people knew how supportive and caring these women are.
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What part of being an ICAN Chapter Leader are you most excited about?
Education!! I want to see change in our community and I firmly believe that starts with educating women before their first birth.
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What are some of your strongest beliefs about cesarean/VBAC awareness?
All women have a right to informed consent. It’s unacceptable to me that women are given one option by their OBs and not told about the risks that are involved with each choice.
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How would someone describe you?
I’m passionate about what I believe in and will go to bat for others without a second though. Apparently I’m also funny, but I don’t think of myself that way.
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Please share a little about yourself!
I have 2 daughters. My oldest was a medicated vaginal birth in 2012. When I found out I was pregnant with my second, my husband and I agreed that we should hire a doula and try for a natural birth. At 40+1 weeks my OB discovered that my daughter was breech. After a failed version attempt, I had a cesarean. Unfortunately my cesarean left me with a seroma and I got an infection and spent a week in the hospital on IV antibiotics.
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I’ve been married to the love of my life, Hunter, for 9 years. I have master’s degree and am a speech language pathologist turned part time homemaker. I decided to stay home as much as possible and started a private practice after my oldest daughter was born in 2012. I love to sew and read.
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When is your chapter’s next meeting time, date, location, and topic?
Our next meeting is August 4 at 6:30 pm. My physical therapist will be coming to speak to the group about 1. the normal impact of pregnancy on a woman’s musculoskeletal system, 2. the effects cesarean will additionally have, 3. other complications that can develop over time.
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Welcome, Casey! We can’t wait to see how you impact your community!
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